Accelerated Rehab 1 Philadelphia

Accelerated RehabMovement Assessment and Active Care Seminar with Jason Brown, DC

  • Rehab 2 Performance logo Skills Review

  • CERT Prep

  • Master the Fundamentals

  • Excel with Efficiency

Jason W. BrownHone your craft, improve your efficiency and clinical decision making, & prepare for the Clinical Rehabilitation Specialist Certification through the International Society of Clinical Rehab Specialists.

 

Date:
October 4-5, 2014

Time:runner-chiropractic
Saturday 9am-5pm
Sunday 9am-2pm

Location:
Fitness Together
115 W State St.
Media, PA 19063

 

What others have said about the course:

Thanks for a thought provoking weekend! – Jamie Robertson, PT

 

This course organized my thinking better than any other course I’ve attended.

 

I just wanted to personally thank you for your seminar.  It really gave me clarity on many of the rehabilitation principles, especially motor control using the planes. – Ian Ledger, DC

 

I would consider it one of the best courses I have attended to date. The application of everything that was gone over in the Accelerated Rehab course was straight forward and the workbook that accompanied the course has been a tool that I have not let leave my side as I work with patients and athletes in their training. – Erik Haroldson, DC

Part 1 Course Outline:

  • Functional model overview
  • Functional assessment:  Mag 7 and follow up assessments [train your eye and expand your toolbox]
  • Liebenson’s Clinical Audit Process  [CAP] (in detail with examples).  [How to use your assessment results to drive your exercise selection]
  • Discussion of how several models can fit together.  Combining the work of the Prague school (Janda & Lewit) & DNS, FMS & SFMA, McGill, Butler & Moseley to create synergy.  Find the strengths and limitations; harness the power and avoid the pitfalls. Including addition of current training theory and application for efficient, rapid results.
  • Sparing strategies & finding the functional range [avoid aggravation and encourage activity through the acute stages]
  • Mobilization (emphasis on thoracic, hip, ankle) [enhancing active ROM and proprioception through active mobility exercises]
  • Discussion of mobility and stability.  When to choose which tool.  Review of the CAP.
  • Core stabilization (creating an anchor, while maintaining mobility and the ball and socket joints).  Training the orchestra to play the right tune at the right time.  Then working to increase the volume and duration.  [create harmony of breathing and bracing, then add endurance and power.]
  • Motor control theory, motor learning, and cueing.  How to get your exercise selection to transfer into sport and ADLs. How to achieve retention so your progress lasts.

Part 2 then emphasizes extremity support and function.  Assessment and correction of the upper and lower quarters.

Winkelman Course in NY

Movement Skill Acquisition and Transfer:
Applying Coaching Science and Motivational Frameworks

with Nick Winkelman, MSc, CSCS*D | Director of Movement (Performance Innovation Team) @ EXOS  [formerly Athlete’s Performance]

Join us Saturday & Sunday, August 2-3, 2014 at RPI in Troy, NY for Movement Skills Acquisition and Transfer: Applying Coaching Science and Motivational Frameworks.

winkelmannickThis course is open to all professionals who strive to make people and athletes better.

Ideal for Coaches, Trainers, & Clinicians.

For those who coach movement, are your words effective?

For those who prescribe home exercise plans or design training sessions, are your designs optimal for motor learning?

For those who help create peak performance, how can you get results better and faster than you are currently?

 

COURSE OUTLINE:

  1. Movement Skill Development: Systems Overview

  2. Science and Application of Acceleration

  3. Acceleration Progressions

  4. Science and Application of Absolute Speed (Running)

  5. Absolute Speed Progressions

  6. Reactive Agility: Developing Speed that Transfers

  7. Reactive Agility Progressions

  8. Athletic Profiling: Testing for Transfer

  9. The Science of Coaching: Motor Control and Learning a Dynamic Systems Approach

  10. The Science of Coaching: Instruction, Feedback, and Cueing

  11. The Science of Coaching: Developing Environments that Motivate

The course is mixed lecture and practical.  Please come dressed to participate.  This includes bringing or wearing athletic footwear.

Date: August 2-3, 2014

Time:Saturday 9:00-6:00
Sunday 8:00-3:00

Cost:   $359
(register below)

Location: The course will be held at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) on their East Campus Athletic Village (ECAV).
ECAV is at 80 Peck Drive, Troy, NY 12065.  Look for D-Lot, the closest parking lot.

ECAV-RPII have the pleasure of attending Nick’s lectures in the past.  Those who attend will enjoy a very practical application of cutting edge coaching science and motor control theory.  Sharpen your practical skills by learning from someone in the trenches.

Men’s Journal article about this years NFL draft and NFL combine  preparation.

Winkelman’s Movement Lecture on The Science of Coaching.

 What We Say Matters: Part I  & What We Say Matters Part II

 Movement Skill Acquisition and Transfer:



Registration
Name:
Email:




Nearest airport: Albany, NY (There is a complimentary shuttle to the Troy Hilton Garden Inn)

Nearest hotel: http://www.troy.hgi.com/

Hilton Garden Inn Troy

235 Hoosick Street, Troy, NY, 12180
518-272-1700

Cumpelik

JiriCumpelik-rehabchiropractorGroupI had the pleasure of hosting Jiri Cumpelik, PT, PhD from Prague.  His physiotherapy and yoga background create a unique blend and a wonderful course.  We had a great group assembled and here are a few of the points and reminders I took away.  [Disclaimer: All brilliance is the result of Jiri’s skills and the history of the Prague school.  Any inaccuracies are my own.]

Breathing:

  • Breathing is often coached into the abdomen.  What is more ideal is to coach lower rib (lateral) expansion.  This leaves the abdomen as a fixed point.
  • Breathing is disrupted if the 3 points of contact for the foot are not kept.  Supportive shoes or orthotics can do this. You will find lateral breathing diminished.
  • When the diaphragm has sternal support breathing is anterior upper abdominal; with costal support it is anterior mid abdominal; with lumbar (TL junction) support it is lower abdominal.  Ideally it should be all 3 simultaneously and lateral expansion of the ribs should occur effortlessly.

Foot contact:

  • The foot is dependent on 3 points of support. This afferent information feeds the system.  Yes, this creates arches.  However, supporting the arch creates the illusion of proper positioning, but it does so without creating any of the necessary afferent info.
  • If you were repairing an archway or a bridge… would you support the arch or would you support the pillars?
  • Arch support or back support without improving afferentation is analogous to putting your team in the right positions, but with little or no communication from the sideline about what play or defense they should be running.  It looks good, but the tendency will be towards chaos and compensation rather than organized, efficient force.
  • Foot contact is often more toward the heels than it should be.  In standing and walking we need to encourage forefoot weight bearing without loading/overloading the toes.  The same is true in squat and dead-lift. The pressure through the heel should feel like it is going into the ground with a 45 degree angle posteriorly.

Posture:

  • Proper sitting doesn’t require a cushioned, supportive,  high back executive chair.  It requires quality input.  Likely a firmer chair.   Think of the piano player, someone who sits for peak performance.  They gracefully sit on an unsupported stool/bench.  With all the practice hours required, why don’t they sit on something more resembling a desk chair?  Do they know something most of us don’t?
  • “It is easier to move a chair than a sack of sand.”  – Reference to firm posture rather than slouched, jello-like, amoebic positioning of some people.  Having structure and support makes movement and control of the body more effortless.  Postural control creates efficiency.
  • Posture can be driven from the foot as described above, it can also be facilitated through the hand.  “Stretch the pinky” (elongate and radially deviate) is a way to get support from the upper extremity.  This can be acheiecd open chain and during gait on the reach forward as well as during true supporting functions.
  • Sitting posture should not be on the “sit bones” as so many conveniently describe.  Looking at the shape of the pelvis is sitting on the ischial tuberosity realistic?  Would you design a system to balance on a roughened, round object?  It was suggested that sitting on the ischiopubic ramus was more ideal.  With a slight anterior lean, this provides a ‘flat spot’ to balance on.  Try it. See what your body tells you.  (remember to use a firm chair)
  • Forward head carriage is understood to be compensatory.  The chin tuck can improve this.  It can also improve posterior breathing.  However, too much chin tuck can impair lateral breathing.  (We do not want to sacrifice lateral breathing for the appearance of good head position.  You can pack the neck too far.  I am playing with finding the right degree of chin tuck based on breathing patterns.  If lateral diminishes, you’ve gone too far.)
  • It must be practiced, “All the time”.  While we discuss sets and reps, one of the main take homes was that the small, but important changes we were making needed to be integrated into all activities.  They should become part of your life.  This was likely the hardest, but most rewarding part.  It requires a lifestyle change, not simply doing some correctives periodically as prescribed.
  • Posture is synergy (or as McGill describes “the orchestra”).  To get synergy back, play a few leading notes (movements or positions that can stimulate quality positions):  abduct the toes, elongate the pinky, open your mouth, “Kaa” (depress the hyoid), tongue position/movement, eye movement, feeling ground contact, …. & many more.  Once the musicians know what tune they’re supposed to be playing others come on line, listen to your body and recognize the changes.

Random:

  • Hand positions (even open chain) can drive breathing.  See mudras and experience it for yourself.  Some beautiful demos during a course break.
  • Children will be able to control their sphincter when they can stand on one leg.  [As this often happens around 3.5 years and we see children potty trained earlier than this, we question what happens?  While uncertain, hyperactive pelvic floor seems very possible to me.]

Final Thought:

Contemporary clinicians and trainers (and just about everyone who reads this blog) are aware that we think in terms of the CNS rather than specific muscles or joints.  We reference muscles or joints for the ease of communication, but we appreciate the fact that we are trying to create neurologic change and are evaluating neurologic dysfunctions in movement.  Here’s where I think many of us fall short.

I’ve seen the Gray Cook, PT quote, ““The brain does not think in terms of individual muscles it thinks in terms of movement”  referenced hundreds of times.  The problem I see is while we think we’re training the CNS, many take from this quote “movement not muscles”.  I think too many omit the word “thinks”.  (You’ll notice Gray put it in there.)  Doing correctives to improve movement isn’t enough (but it is a good start).  The brain is familiar with half kneeling, bear position, etc, ….   however it also doesn’t think in these terms.  The brain knows goals.  I want, I need.  As we use positions and movement to improve dysfunction we must engage the brain in thinking.  Run the mental program of reaching for a desired object, operate the software to open the mouth and eat a sandwich, and focus on ground contact & pushing away.  These external cues feed the CNS what it truly wants and knows.  (Ex.  grab the car keys, reach for the doorknob, give me a high-five.)  Give targets and goals during exercise.  They can be physical or based on mental imagery.  You’ll be surprised how much changes even with a different image of what we’re doing.   Follow the same principles of movement, but get the brain running the software it needs to.

Finally, a public thank you to Jiri Cumpelik for sharing his thoughts, ideas, and views.

Link of interest: A blog post from Geoff Girwitz who attended Jiri’s workshop in Newark.

Accelerated Rehab Part 1 -Seattle

Accelerated RehabMovement Assessment and Active Care Seminar with Jason Brown, DC

  • Rehab 2 Performance logo Skills Review

  • CERT Prep

  • Master the Fundamentals

  • Excel with Efficiency

Jason W. BrownHone your craft, improve your efficiency and clinical decision making, & prepare for the Clinical Rehabilitation Specialist Certification through the International Society of Clinical Rehab Specialists.

 

Date:
April 5-6, 2014

Time:runner-chiropractic
Saturday 9am-5pm
Sunday 9am-2pm

Location:
NW Sports Rehab
33400 13th Pl S
Federal Way, WA 98003

Questions: Contact me

Registration:
Early-bird discount through Friday 03/14.

 What others have said about the course:

Thanks for a thought provoking weekend! – Jamie Robertson, PT

 

This course organized my thinking better than any other course I’ve attended.

 

I just wanted to personally thank you for your seminar.  It really gave me clarity on many of the rehabilitation principles, especially motor control using the planes. – Ian Ledger, DC

 

I would consider it one of the best courses I have attended to date. The application of everything that was gone over in the Accelerated Rehab course was straight forward and the workbook that accompanied the course has been a tool that I have not let leave my side as I work with patients and athletes in their training. – Erik Haroldson, DC

Part 1 Course Outline:

  • Functional model overview
  • Functional assessment:  Mag 7 and follow up assessments [train your eye and expand your toolbox]
  • Liebenson’s Clinical Audit Process  [CAP] (in detail with examples).  [How to use your assessment results to drive your exercise selection]
  • Discussion of how several models can fit together.  Combining the work of the Prague school (Janda & Lewit) & DNS, FMS & SFMA, McGill, Butler & Moseley to create synergy.  Find the strengths and limitations; harness the power and avoid the pitfalls. Including addition of current training theory and application for efficient, rapid results.
  • Sparing strategies & finding the functional range [avoid aggravation and encourage activity through the acute stages]
  • Mobilization (emphasis on thoracic, hip, ankle) [enhancing active ROM and proprioception through active mobility exercises]
  • Discussion of mobility and stability.  When to choose which tool.  Review of the CAP.
  • Core stabilization (creating an anchor, while maintaining mobility and the ball and socket joints).  Training the orchestra to play the right tune at the right time.  Then working to increase the volume and duration.  [create harmony of breathing and bracing, then add endurance and power.]
  • Motor control theory, motor learning, and cueing.  How to get your exercise selection to transfer into sport and ADLs. How to achieve retention so your progress lasts.

Part 2 then emphasizes extremity support and function.  Assessment and correction of the upper and lower quarters.

Jiri Cumpelik, PT

Prague RehabBringing the Prague School to you.

Prague School in Newark, NJ!

I had the pleasure of meeting PhDr Jiri Cumpelik during a recent trip to Prague. Jiri Cumpelik & Jason BrownHe was kind enough to allow me to visit him while he was treating performers at the National Theater in Prague.  While we were only able to spend a few hours together it became very clear to me that he has a deep appreciation for movement, body position, breathing, and training mindful movement and that I had a lot to learn.  I’ve remained in contact with Jiri and he’s graciously accepted an invitation to return to the U.S. to instruct.  While he continues to teach in Europe, Jiri has been absent from the US for some time.  Some may remember his last visit to the Rehab Institute of Chicago.  This is a course, I’m honored and excited to host.  Details are below for those who wish to join us.

Jiri Cumpelik with Prof. Frantisek Vele

Cumpelik Course details:

Date: April 12-13, 2014
Times: 9-5:30 Saturday. 9-2:30 Sunday.
Location: Newark, NJ @ the Marriott Newark Liberty International Airport. (Group hotel rate by clicking link.)

This location is at the Newark Airport and there is shuttle service for anyone flying in.

For those driving:
Newark Liberty International Airport Marriott
1 Hotel Road
Newark, New Jersey 07114 USA

Please com dressed to participate.

Jiří is the resident physiotherapist for the National Theatre Ballet. He also lectures to students of the Physiotherapy department of the 2nd Faculty of Medicine of the Charles University in Prague and students of the Physical Education and Sport Faculty of the Charles University in Prague, as well as other distinguished institutions throughout Europe.   Jiří’s unique approach combines Yoga with principles of kinesiology (body motion and correct posture).

PhDr. Jiří Čumpelík, PhD is part of the early Prague school learning from the greats of Lewit, Janda, and their contemporaries.  He frequently co-taught with Prof. Vele (seen above) and from his intimate early studies he possesses a deep understanding of the foundation concepts the Prague School of Rehab is known for.  He began studying Yoga in the 1970s in India where he gained an insight into the physiology of breathing and its influence on posture and inner stability. He further researched spinal and breathing exercises as preventive and therapeutic techniques for functional disorders. He is published in several texts including: Yoga-Based Training for Spinal Stability in Dr. Liebenson’s Rehabilitation of the Spine (2nd ed) and Clinical Rehabilitation, edited by Dr. Pavel Kolar.

 

“The goal of our yoga-based exercises is to repair the altered CNS postural and respiratory programs and to restore spinal stability.”

 

jiri-cumpelik-yoga-class-4

“In a functional and mobile spine, the physiological movement of the cervical spine starts from T4 and progresses upward, and the movements of the lumbar spine from T6 and go downward.”

jiri-cumpelik-yoga-class-1

“In chronic cases, local mobilization can relieve local problems temporarily, but resolution of the condition is only possible by repairing the faulty respiratory program controlled by the CNS.”

Course outline:

The relationship of breathing with posture stabilization

The concept is based on personal experiences, own research, child development and yoga

The course emphasis will be on the relationship between breathing, posture and its stabilization

  • Theory, evaluation, therapy, prevention exercises
  • Pelvic floor, diaphragm and upper aperture of the thorax its interaction and correlation with breathing and postural function
  • Stereognosis function and posture
  • Importance of starting position for effective exercise
  • Positioning of the foot and its influence on the breathing and posture (effective treatment of the flat foot)
  • Evaluation of walking movement and treatment

Practical

  • Spinal exercises
  • Breathing
  • Perception of the body and mind
  • Stability of posture

Preparatory sequence of spinal exercise

Concept of breathing

  •  The breathing movement is continual process and therefore if we have right concept about the natural form of breathing movement we can come to conclusion if  posture is stable or needs to be changed. Practical demonstration for diagnosis.

Concept of posture

  • Posture is any position which is holding the body against gravity. Hence posture must be stable otherwise certain parts of the body will be overstraining, which leads to pain and if not treated to structural changes. The longer we ignore the proper concept of the posture, the more difficulty we meet later on in the therapeutics.

Concept of perception

  • Before we are able to move our body we must have the inner picture about the movement. This inner picture is formed in the mind on the base of sensory information. We are getting information about the outside world as well the inner body to be able to control the movement. The mind is able to decide what kind of proprioception setup is good for our stable posture (motoric intelligence).  Perception of the body must be a part of the postural training.

Concept of posture stability

  • There is not general agreement about posture – different authors trying to define their own aspects of vision and there is not any reliable method to prove these individual concepts.
  • Up to now there does not exist a method, which can objectively measure the stability of the posture. Posturography, plantography methods are informing us about how the weight of the body is distributed on to the foot, but not how its influencing other parts of the body. We are trying to develop a photorespirography method, which will tell us much more about it.
  • Body stability is a concept, how all moving segments are aligned with the help of stabilization process initiated by intention to move. All these processes are part of the course training.

Therefore it is proposed to concentrate on the basic principle of child development and on biomechanical, neurophysiology aspects.

Stanford Cook McGill

Rehab 2 Performance logoI recently had the pleasure of writing a blog post for Rehab2Performance.com.

Two giants in the field, Gray Cook, PT and Stuart McGill, PhD, assembled to present their viewpoints on movement assessment, arranged and moderated by Craig Liebenson, DC.  Assessing Movement: A contrast in approaches & future directions was held at Stanford University and co-hosted by Stanford Sports Medicine and Rehab2Performance.  Such a prestigious location was fitting, and even led to Gray uncharacteristically appearing in a jacket (which didn’t last the whole day, and he quietly told me “jackets are for funerals and Stanford”).  For the nearly 350 professionals in attendance, it was nothing short of spectacular.  With representatives from Asia, Europe, and throughout North America ranging from students, to fitness professionals, performance coaches, and clinicians, there was a bit of perspective for everyone.

See the rest of the review on the Rehab2Performance Blog

Liebenson with Cook and McGill

Organized by Craig Liebenson, DC (left) a great conversation between Stuart McGill, PhD (center) and Gray Cook, PT (right) was held at Stanford University.