Accelerated Rehab- Part 2 Philadelphia

 

acceleratedrehab

ACCELERATED REHAB (& training): R2P Skills Review Course
with Jason Brown, DC, DACRB

  • Rehab 2 Performance logo Skills Review

  • CERT Prep

  • Master the Fundamentals

  • Excel with Efficiency

Hone your craft, improve your efficiency and clinical decision making, & prepare for  The CERT through Rehab 2 Performance (R2P) and the International Society of Clinical Rehab Specialists (ISCRS).

Assess movement of the extremities, Train the Brain.

Date:
February 7-8, 2015

Time:
Saturday 10am-6pm
Sunday 9am-2pm

Location:
Fitness Together
115 W State St.
Media, PA 19063

Questions: Contact me

Registration:

Part 2 emphasizes extremity support and function.  Assessment and correction of the upper and lower quarters.  (It is not necessary to complete part 1 to register and appreciate part 2.)

OUTLINE:

  • Review of functional assessment methods aimed at detecting upper and lower quarter dysfunction.
  • Setting the foundation: the role of the torso (spine position, posture, and breathing) in extremity movement.
  • Proximal stability for distal mobility [and a conversation about how distal afferentation drives proximal stability].
  • Controlling the sagittal plane.  Stability and control in the frontal and sagittal planes.
  • Upper quarter mobility: thoracic spine, ribs, and wrist.   Assessment and active interventions.
  • Upper quarter stability: open and closed chain.
  • The interplay of mobility and stability in complex UE patterns.
  • Review of coaching, cueing, and motor control theory.
  • Role of proprioception.
  • Lower quarter mobility: hip and ankle.  Assessment and active interventions.
  • Lower quarter stability:  hip, knee, and foot.  Discussion of valgus collapse, trendelenburg, and hyperprontation.  Open and closed chain movements.
  • A refreshing/challenging look at the squat pattern.
  • Clinical decision making:  How the assessment guides exercise selection.  How the Clinical Audit Process determines compliance.  Reassessment and the next step; progressions, regressions, and tangents.
  • Progression to athletic, end-stage of rehab exercise.  Pair/Group/Team training.

 

Thanks for a thought provoking weekend! – Jamie Robertson, PT

 

This course organized my thinking better than any other course I’ve attended.

 

I just wanted to personally thank you for your seminar.  It really gave me clarity on many of the rehabilitation principles, especially motor control using the planes. – Ian Ledger, DC

 

On Monday morning I was already applying what I learned to help my patients.

 

I would consider it one of the best courses I have attended to date. The application of everything that was gone over in the Accelerated Rehab course was straight forward and the workbook that accompanied the course has been a tool that I have not let leave my side as I work with patients and athletes in their training. – Erik Haroldson, DC

Accelerated Rehab Part 2 -Seattle

 

acceleratedrehab

ACCELERATED REHAB (& training): R2P Skills Review Course
with Jason Brown, DC, DACRB

  • Rehab 2 Performance logo Skills Review

  • CERT Prep

  • Master the Fundamentals

  • Excel with Efficiency

Hone your craft, improve your efficiency and clinical decision making, & prepare for  The CERT through Rehab 2 Performance (R2P) and the International Society of Clinical Rehab Specialists (ISCRS).

Assess movement of the extremities, Train the Brain.

Date:
November 22-23, 2014

Time:
Saturday 9am-5pm
Sunday 8am-1pm

Location:
NW Sports Rehab
33400 13th Pl S
Federal Way, WA 98003

Questions: Contact me

Registration:
Early bird through 10/22/2014

Part 2 emphasizes extremity support and function.  Assessment and correction of the upper and lower quarters.  (It is not necessary to complete part 1 to register and appreciate part 2.)

OUTLINE:

  • Review of functional assessment methods aimed at detecting upper and lower quarter dysfunction.
  • Setting the foundation: the role of the torso (spine position, posture, and breathing) in extremity movement.
  • Proximal stability for distal mobility [and a conversation about how distal afferentation drives proximal stability].
  • Controlling the sagittal plane.  Stability and control in the frontal and sagittal planes.
  • Upper quarter mobility: thoracic spine, ribs, and wrist.   Assessment and active interventions.
  • Upper quarter stability: open and closed chain.
  • The interplay of mobility and stability in complex UE patterns.
  • Review of coaching, cueing, and motor control theory.
  • Role of proprioception.
  • Lower quarter mobility: hip and ankle.  Assessment and active interventions.
  • Lower quarter stability:  hip, knee, and foot.  Discussion of valgus collapse, trendelenburg, and hyperprontation.  Open and closed chain movements.
  • Clinical decision making:  How the assessment guides exercise selection.  How the Clinical Audit Process determines compliance.  Reassessment and the next step; progressions, regressions, and tangents.

 

Thanks for a thought provoking weekend! – Jamie Robertson, PT

 

This course organized my thinking better than any other course I’ve attended.

 

I just wanted to personally thank you for your seminar.  It really gave me clarity on many of the rehabilitation principles, especially motor control using the planes. – Ian Ledger, DC

 

On Monday morning I was already applying what I learned to help my patients.

 

I would consider it one of the best courses I have attended to date. The application of everything that was gone over in the Accelerated Rehab course was straight forward and the workbook that accompanied the course has been a tool that I have not let leave my side as I work with patients and athletes in their training. – Erik Haroldson, DC

What do you know about FAI?

I found myself talking about this with patients and other providers a lot lately…. thought someone else may be interested.

Sometimes you must admit when you’re not the expert… this is it for me.  Still working at mastering this.  So here’s what a few others have to say.FAI Hip

As several of my patients had hockey related hip pain I asked a Canadian… here’s what Jeff Cubos, DC sent me: http://www.jeffcubos.com/2011/08/02/so-your-athlete-has-fai-now-what/

From Kevin Neeld: http://www.kevinneeld.com/2011/training-around-femoroacetabular-impingement

From Eric Cressey: http://www.ericcressey.com/newsletter150html

From Craig Liebenson, DC: http://www.craigliebenson.com/?p=1741

And below, 52 seconds to remind you that conservative measures should be attempted prior to performing surgery due to imaging findings of impingement.  (Please seek care and advise from a qualified health care professional to be sure you’re a candidate for conservative care and something more pressing is not going on.)  For appropriate conservative care, see above links.

Do I need orthotics or special running shoes???

An age old question from so many runners, walkers, athletes, and those who work on their feet.  In hopes of catching the blog up, this along with others, will be old posts that I often find myself discussing with patients and colleagues.

Read NY Times Blog Post below:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/21/phys-ed-do-certain-types-of-sneakers-prevent-injuries/

While not a definitive study, it appears to have debunked the idea that so many people need ‘motion control’ shoes due to foot problems.  The original idea was that a ‘motion control shoe’ reduces pronation and would subsequently reduce injury in those pronators who wear them.  I suspect that more often pronation is the end-result of another issue  and should not be our main focus.  While in a small number of cases pronation may be solely a foot issue, it is likely that it is the result of a problem farther up the chain (most likely the hip; with delayed onset or weakness of the gluteus medius or lateral rotators).  My estimation is that as we fix pronation with a ‘motion control’ shoe, the compensation for the hip issue is eliminated.  This prevents energy leakage from the system and as energy remains during each step it overloads a different tissue/structure/joint leading to the increased rates of injury noted in the article.  Further study is needed, but we need to be aware of these sacred cows and exercise myths.  Look for future posts on strengthening the foot (foot drills & short foot exercises) as well as hip stability exercises.